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US Debt and the Greece Analogy

Alan GreenspanDon’t be fooled by today’s low interest rates, writes Greenspan; the government could very quickly discover the limits of its borrowing capacity. “With huge deficits currently having no evident effect on either inflation or long-term interest rates, the budget constraints of the past are missing. It is little comfort that the dollar is still the least worst of the major fiat currencies. Read more

25 Signs of Expectations for an Economic Collapse in 2010

By: Michael T. Snyder Bad economic signs are everywhere: consumer confidence is plummeting, banks are hoarding cash, financial experts are bearish and almost everyone is buying gold. The G20 nations have all pledged to dramatically cut government spending in an effort to control debt, so worries about a double-dip recession are escalating. Read more

Rob McEwen: Looking Ahead of the Curve

By: Karen RocheRob McEwen, a veteran of the resource industry, is CEO of US Gold Corporation and chairman of its board. He recently sat down with Roche for this exclusive, wide-ranging interview. While hoping to avoid the “darkest hour”, he describes fearsome parallels between the Weimar Republic of the late 1920s and early 1930s to the US of today. A quote: “I think the economic news will continue to get worse. Read more

US Marks 3rd-Largest, Single-Day Debt Increase

By: Stephan DinanThe US debt leapt $166 billion in a single day last week, the third-largest increase in US history, at a time when Congress is balking over higher spending and debt has become a key policy battleground. Read more

Nowhere to Run, Nowhere to Hide!

By: Satyajit Das“The twelve months starting March 2009 was the year of wishful thinking. Central banks cut interest rates and governments opened their check books providing a flood of cheap money that gave the illusion of recovery and a normal functioning economy. Pouring a lot of water into a bucket with a large hole created the impression that the receptacle was almost full. Read more

US Debt and the Greece Analogy

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Alan Greenspan
Don’t be fooled by today’s low interest rates, writes Greenspan; the government could very quickly discover the limits of its borrowing capacity. “With huge deficits currently having no evident effect on either inflation or long-term interest rates, the budget constraints of the past are missing. It is little comfort that the dollar is still the least worst of the major fiat currencies.
Read more...

25 Signs of Expectations for an Economic Collapse in 2010

E-mail Print PDF
By: Michael T. Snyder
Bad economic signs are everywhere: consumer confidence is plummeting, banks are hoarding cash, financial experts are bearish and almost everyone is buying gold. The G20 nations have all pledged to dramatically cut government spending in an effort to control debt, so worries about a double-dip recession are escalating.
Read more...

Rob McEwen: Looking Ahead of the Curve

E-mail Print PDF
By: Karen Roche
Rob McEwen, a veteran of the resource industry, is CEO of US Gold Corporation and chairman of its board. He recently sat down with Roche for this exclusive, wide-ranging interview. While hoping to avoid the “darkest hour”, he describes fearsome parallels between the Weimar Republic of the late 1920s and early 1930s to the US of today. A quote: “I think the economic news will continue to get worse.
Read more...

US Marks 3rd-Largest, Single-Day Debt Increase

E-mail Print PDF
By: Stephan Dinan
The US debt leapt $166 billion in a single day last week, the third-largest increase in US history, at a time when Congress is balking over higher spending and debt has become a key policy battleground.
Read more...

Nowhere to Run, Nowhere to Hide!

E-mail Print PDF
By: Satyajit Das

“The twelve months starting March 2009 was the year of wishful thinking. Central banks cut interest rates and governments opened their check books providing a flood of cheap money that gave the illusion of recovery and a normal functioning economy. Pouring a lot of water into a bucket with a large hole created the impression that the receptacle was almost full.
Read more...